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Definitions
Definitions 1

Definitions 1

Photoelectric
Photoelectric Smoke Alarms employ a light emitting diode (LED) to send a beam of light across a chamber. When smoke enters the chamber, the particles scatter the photons. A photocell installed at an angle to the diode senses the light, and subsequently sets off the alarm. In UL tests, photoelectric alarms have performed more effectively with slow burning, smoldering types of fires that can burn for hours before bursting into flame and emit large smoke particles. These types of fires include cigarettes burning in furnishings and bedding.

Ionization
Ionization Smoke Alarms contain a minuscule amount of a material called Americium 241, which emits alpha particles that collide with the oxygen and nitrogen in the air and to create ions. These ions conduct electricity and allow a steady electrical current to flow between two electrodes. Smoke enters the detection chamber and the alpha particles are absorbed by the larger smoke particles, causing a drop in the current, and the alarm is triggered. In UL tests, ionization alarms have performed more effectively with fast, flaming fires which rapidly consume combustibles and spread quickly emitting tiny particles. These types of fires include flammable liquids, loosely packed light combustibles, and kitchen grease.

Heat Detectors
Heat detectors warn of fire when the temperature in the area around the smoke detector reaches a certain level. Heat detectors do not notice smoke. Heat detector could be valuable additional protection in areas where smoke detectors are not recommended are not recommended. They are not recommended for the use in bedrooms or sleeping areas.

Carbon Monoxide
Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, toxic gas that has the molecular formula CO. The molecule consists of a carbon atom that is triply bonded to an oxygen atom. Carbon Monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of the fossil fuels - gas, oil, coal and wood used in boilers, engines, oil burners, gas fires, water heaters, solid fuel appliances and open fires. Dangerous amounts of CO can accumulate when as a result of poor installation, poor maintenance or failure or damage to an appliance in service, the fuel is not burned properly, or when rooms are poorly ventilated and the Carbon Monoxide is unable to escape.

UL Listed
Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. is a the trusted third party source across the globe for product compliance. Benefiting a range of customers - from manufacturers and retailers to consumers and regulating bodies. UL is the standard by which everthing in this industry is judged.

UL Ratings for Fire Extinguisher Explanation

Asbestos Exposure and Fire Safety
Read more on Asbestos Exposure
Fire Extinguisher Agents

A Quick Guide to Fire Extinguishing Agents
Class of Fire
AGENT
A
B
C
K
Multi-Purpose

Regular


Purple K


Carbon Dioxide


Wet Chemical



Halotron

Water



Foam


Fire Classifications

Fire Classifications
A
B
C
K
Wood
Flamable Liquids
Electrical Equipment
Commercial Kitchens
Paper
Gases
Wiring

Cloth
Solvents
Controls

Rubber
Oil/Gasoline
Motors

Trash
Paint
Data Processing Panels

Plastics
Lacquers
Appliances


Tar



Synthetics


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